Time capsule hidden under Morecambe’s Polo Tower

The final part of the Polo Tower demolition in Morecambe. Picture by David Hodgson.
The final part of the Polo Tower demolition in Morecambe. Picture by David Hodgson.
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Here is some more on the time capsule buried in the foundations of the Polo Tower.

This cutting from the December 14, 1994 edition of The Visitor shows the capsule being put into place.

A cutting from The Visitor in December 1994 shows a time capsule being buried in the foundations of the Polo Tower in Morecambe.

A cutting from The Visitor in December 1994 shows a time capsule being buried in the foundations of the Polo Tower in Morecambe.

The capsule was a milk churn containing brochures from Morecambe’s old Wild West theme park Frontierland, copies of The Visitor, photos of Frontierland officials, a map of Morecambe and Heysham and beer bottles.

Pictured in hard hats are Frontierland’s general manager at the time, John Harding and park manager Mick Rothwell.

Paul Massey, now a bus driver for Stagecoach but at the time an operator of Frontierland rides including the Texas Tornado roller coaster, said he helped to bury the time capsule alongside his colleague Tony Whittaker and boss Steve Riley.

Incidentally, other members of the Frontierland management team in 1994 included Jason Brindle and Jill Burgan (catering), Jamie Graham (bars), Nobby Brown (works manager), Carole Kellett (retail), Eric Comer (arcades) and Mick O’Toole (games).

Others working at the park at the time included our very own content editor Greg Lambert (games supervisor), cashier Peter Roberts Snr (father of well-known local DJ Peter ‘DJ Pep’ Roberts) and Debbie Ellershaw, nee Walsh, now landlady of The Exchange pub in Morecambe.

Debbie, who worked in Frontierland’s catering department, recalls the May 1995 opening day of the Polo Tower very well.

“We had (to prepare) a posh meal for all the VIP people in the Crazy Horse Saloon after the tower was opened,” she said.

“I had to shove an apple inside a pig’s head and was nearly sick!

“Before that I spent about three hours pumping balloons up to let go.”

Debbie also remembers stunt rider Johann Traber’s motorbike ride on a high wire to the top of the Polo Tower at the official opening.

“He had about six goes before he managed it!” she said.