Morecambe gran thought she had flu but it was cancer

Photo: David Hurst'Myeloma Cancer sufferer, Daisy Thompson of Wentworth Crescent, Westgate, Morecambe, who believes people with cancer can still live a fullfilled life. Pictured with her dog Bertie
Photo: David Hurst'Myeloma Cancer sufferer, Daisy Thompson of Wentworth Crescent, Westgate, Morecambe, who believes people with cancer can still live a fullfilled life. Pictured with her dog Bertie

A simple check for flu at the doctors turned a Morecambe gran’s life upside down when she discovered it wasn’t just a cold but a rare form of cancer.

Daisy Thompson, 71, moved to Morecambe from the Lake District 15 months ago to be closer to family and utilities.

But what she thought would be a move for an easier life turned out to be a move for a harder one when she discovered in just 12 weeks she had myeloma cancer.

Mrs Thompson, who lives on Wentworth Crescent, said: “I went to the doctors on Westgate a year last November, a brand new patient, not known to them and I sat in front of the doctor and said I think I’ve got the flu and well it turned out to be this.

“It was a shock and yet I dealt with it because would somebody else tell me what to do?

“I’m not sitting down thinking woe is me this is awful, I’m living with cancer not dying with it.”

Myeloma cancer affects the bone marrow which then causes the cancerous cells to spread into the blood stream.

Because it is an incurable cancer Daisy has not been informed about any prognosis figures.

Daisy said: “I’m not morbid about that, I think at 71 aren’t I lucky?

“The care at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary is just fantastic.

“I have got to 71 and I have done lots of things and had an interesting life.”

One of those passions in life that Daisy misses is travelling the world on her motorbike.

She said: “I’ve travelled all over the place on my motorbike and I do miss it.

“I miss everything about being able to do things that I considered normality and even though I tried very hard for it to not beat me it does.”

The mum-of-two doesn’t travel far because of the constant fatigue she suffers from but is determined not to let it get the best of her.

Daisy said: “I could sit down and cry and give into it or I can think nope this isn’t going to beat me, so I fight back as much as I am able to fight back.

“I don’t want to sound condescending as if people with cancer don’t try because we are all different.”

Although Daisy’s children both live in New Zealand she has constant visits from friends and neighbours.

The gran-of-four also believes she is strong willed and able to be positive about her condition because of her upbringing.

She said: “I came from a family of 15. We were very self sufficient, we did a paper round and a milk round just to earn a few bob.

“Nothing about my life was easy but lovely and interesting and super fun.

“I think it gave me a good grounding to cope with not just this but everything life has thrown at me.”

Daisy feels there needs to be more education about cancer so that people are not frightened to talk about it.

“We do not talk about it enough or tell people enough, without frightening people.

“If you feel poorly go to your doctor, I thought I had the flu.

“For my funeral I want a big tub putting at the church door saying please leave all tears in this bucket.”