Lancaster MP votes in favour of ‘confirmatory referendum’ on Brexit

Pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit protesters hold flags as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London on March 14, 2019 as members debate a motion on whether to seek a delay to Britain's exit from the EU. - MPs vote on March 14 on whether to seek a Brexit delay, as the chaotic process to end Britain's 46-year membership of the EU plunges the country into deep political crisis. (Photo by Tolga AKMEN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit protesters hold flags as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London on March 14, 2019 as members debate a motion on whether to seek a delay to Britain's exit from the EU. - MPs vote on March 14 on whether to seek a Brexit delay, as the chaotic process to end Britain's 46-year membership of the EU plunges the country into deep political crisis. (Photo by Tolga AKMEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Lancaster and Morecambe’s MPs have been voting on four different options to try and find a way forward on Brexit.

For the second time, Morecambe and Lunesdale MP David Morris voted against all four of the Brexit options presented to Parliament on April 1, none of which ultimately commanded a majority with MPs.

Mr Morris said he would continue to vote for Prime Minister Theresa May’s deal.

Lancaster and Fleetwood MP Cat Smith voted in favour of three of the options, including holding a confirmatory referendum, but she abstained on a “Parliamentary supremacy” motion, which would have given power for MPs to block leaving the EU with no-deal by cancelling Brexit if it won’t grant a further extension beyond April 12.

Many MPs abstained on this.

The Customs Union option lost by just three votes.

The confirmatory referendum option would mean holding a public vote to confirm any withdrawl agreement agreed by Parliament.

The four options presented to Parliament were the four most popular options of eight presented last week.

See how the two MPs voted in previous indicative votes here.

David Morris, MP for Morecambe and Lunesdale voted:

Against a Customs union, which would seek a UK-wide customs union with the EU (Ken Clarke’s proposal - 273 votes for, 276 against)

Against Common Market 2.0 which would mean remaining in the European single market and seeking a temporary customs union with the EU (Nick Boles’s proposal - 261 votes for, 282 against)

Against a confirmatory referendum which would mean holding a public vote to confirm any withdrawal agreement agreed by Parliament (Peter Kyle and Phil Wilson’s proposal - 280 votes for, 292 against)

Against parliamentary supremacy which would give power for MPs to block leaving with no-deal by cancelling Brexit if EU won’t grant a further extension beyond 12 April (Joanna Cherry’s proposal - 191 votes for, 292 against)

Cat Smith, MP for Lancaster and Fleetwood voted:

For a Customs union, for Common Market 2.0, for a confirmatory referendum and abstained on parliamentary supremacy.