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Housing plan for Halton - just days after village flooded

Flooded homes in Pennystone Road, Halton.
Flooded homes in Pennystone Road, Halton.
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Plans to build up to 60 new homes in Halton have been submitted to Lancaster City Council - just days after the village flooded and residents called for a halt on new developments.

The “Reserved Matters” for the plan, which was originally submitted in 2014, seeks final permission to build 60 homes on fields in Low Road.

The meeting about flooding at The Centre in Halton on November 28.

The meeting about flooding at The Centre in Halton on November 28.

The developer - Forge Weir View Ltd - already has outline planning permission for the site, subject to conditions including a scheme for the disposal of foul and surface water.

Halton Parish Council objected to the initial plans, as well as 59 residents, some of whom expressed concern over the “impacts upon sewerage network and impact of surface water run-off” at the time.

There are currently two other active applications for housing developments in Halton - one for 87 homes, also on fields in Low Road, and another for 66 dwellings on fields in Kirkby Lonsdale Road - bringing the total potential new homes to over 200.

At a meeting in Halton this week, angry and frustrated residents called for a stop to any new housing developments in the village until the current flooding and drainage issues have been dealt with (see this week’s Lancaster Guardian for a full report).

Site of 70 proposed new homes on farmland in Kirkby Lonsdale Road, Halton

Site of 70 proposed new homes on farmland in Kirkby Lonsdale Road, Halton

The Story Homes development in Low Road is currently an outline planning application for farmland south of Low Road and east of Forge Lane.

Part of the field was submerged under a metre of water overnight on Wednesday November 22.

A spokesman for Lancaster City Council said: “This proposal has outline consent only.

“That means that the developer still has to obtain detailed planning approval (known as the ‘Reserved Matters’) for the development.

The field (right) where Story Homes have outline planning permission to build 87 new homes.

The field (right) where Story Homes have outline planning permission to build 87 new homes.

“At the outline stage, the Lead Local Flood Authority had no objection, subject to certain planning conditions relating to drainage.

“The Environment Agency had no objection either.

“The Reserved Matters for this development has recently been received, and so both the Environment Agency and Lead Local Flood Authority will be re-consulted.

“Both of those organisations will need to take into account recent flooding events when providing formal consultation comments.”

A spokesperson for Story Homes said: “We have submitted a planning application for a development of 87 high quality homes off Low Road in Halton.

“Prior to submitting the outline application last year, we carried out a full flood risk assessment of the site.

“This was subject to comment and agreed by both Lancashire County Council as Lead Local Flood Authority and the Environment Agency before our planning application was approved.

“The scheme will be subject to approval by Lancashire County Council as Lead Local Flood Authority and the Environment Agency before work can commence on site.”

With regards the Russell Armer Ltd development on fields off High Road and adjacent to Pointer Grove, to the east of the village, Lancaster City Council said: “This was a full application that was approved earlier this year.

“As such that development can be built out, providing that the developer complies with all planning conditions that are imposed on the planning permission. “Prior to determining this application, the city council consulted the Lead Local Flood Authority, who had no objection subject to certain conditions relating to surface water drainage.

“The Environment Agency responded to their consultation to say that the application did not require any formal comment from them.”

Rachel Crompton, flood risk manager for Lancashire County Council said: “Planning applications for new developments must consider what additional flood risk might be generated to ensure that any new properties receive acceptable protection, and ensure that the development doesn’t make flooding worse for surrounding locations.

“Residents of Halton experienced flooding in a number of locations around the village during last week’s extreme weather conditions.

“Each incident is currently under investigation and we don’t yet have enough information to explain the situation that arose at Low Road.

“These investigations will take account of existing anomalies in local drainage systems which might have contributed to the standing water in the field at Low Road where Storey Homes want to build new houses.

“These factors, and others including the intensity of the rainfall, will be examined in order for the county council to advise landowners and other interested parties on options for reducing future flood risk.

“If we find any new information that changes the underlying risk of flooding associated with the proposed Storey Homes development, we will advise Lancaster City Council’s planning officers and consider how that new information should be taken into account as part of any decision on the planning application.”