£50k award for fellowship at UHMBT

Rose Peel, stroke specialist occupational therapist, with one of the iPads she will use as part of her MSc dissertation project.
Rose Peel, stroke specialist occupational therapist, with one of the iPads she will use as part of her MSc dissertation project.
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A stroke specialist occupational therapist at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust has been awarded £50,000 from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

This makes Rose Peel the first person at the Trust to gain the training award and sponsorship to undertake the pre-doctoral fellowship.

The funding will allow Rose to undertake training and conferences to develop the skills she needs to go on and become a clinical academic.

She said: “I was amazed to find I was awarded the fellowship and honoured to be the first person at the Trust to gain this type of training award.”

An NIHR spokesman said: “We would like to congratulate Rose on her ICA Pre-doctoral Clinical Academic Fellowship (PCAF). This will support her to undertake the academic training she needs to become a competitive Doctoral level candidate.

“The PCAF supports non-medical healthcare professionals who have limited formal academic training to begin their clinical research career.”

As well as undertaking her pre-doctoral fellowship, Rose is studying a Master’s of Science in Clinical Research at the University of Central Lancashire, and will undertake a small project as part of her dissertation that will look at the feasibility of using smartphone apps to support engagement in the rehabilitation of patients who have suffered a stroke.

Research evidence shows frequent repetition of exercises and tasks can improve recovery after stroke. The idea of an app is to help patients carry out the exercises on the ward. The apps have easy to follow videos and instructions, and will help patients take control over their rehabilitation.

Rose has worked at UHMBT for the past 12 months on the Trust’s acute stroke and rehabilitation wards. Her role looks at the skills a person needs to function in everyday life and how they can adapt after stroke. She works closely with the Early Supported Discharge Stroke team and previously worked at Blackpool Fylde and Wyre Hospital.

Rose, who works at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary, added: “I love the variety that working in stroke rehabilitation offers, and the progress we see as people regain independence and return to their daily during roles. We are lucky to be able to work with people as they recover both in the hospital and in their own homes.”

David Wilkinson, Director of People and Organisational Development, UHMBT, said: “A huge congratulations to Rose and we wish her every success on her pre-doctoral fellowship.”

For more information about the NIHR PCAF award visit www.NIHR.ac.uk/PCAF.