‘Promenades, piers... a charming watering place’

Lancashire and Lakeland photographic view album.
Lancashire and Lakeland photographic view album.

A charming ‘photographic view’ album illustrates some of the charms of Lancashire and Lakeland.

The album, probably dating back to the early 1900s, contains 52 views of Morecambe, Heysham, Lancaster, Grane-over-Sands, Ulverston and Barrow-in-Furness.

The West End Pier, gay with Union Jacks flying out in the breeze, is undoubtedly the finest, and is not altogether unsuggestive of the West Pier at Brighton. With its up-to-date appliances and graceful appearance it forms a somewhat striking contrast to its neighbour.

The West End Pier, gay with Union Jacks flying out in the breeze, is undoubtedly the finest, and is not altogether unsuggestive of the West Pier at Brighton. With its up-to-date appliances and graceful appearance it forms a somewhat striking contrast to its neighbour.

It was donated to the Lancaster Guardian by Audrey Clayton.

The album was printed and published by Valentine & Sons, Ltd, Dundee, Edinburgh and London.

In the first of two features, we look at photos of Morecambe and Heysham included in the album.

In the back of the album is listed some of the charms of Lancashire and Lakeland.

Promenade, looking west, with its gay crowds of pleasure seekers and excursion brakes. Beyond is the town, and to the right we see the too assertive advertisement of the Winter Gardens, from which a view of the same scene from a different aspect is given showing the tram lines and Central Pier.

Promenade, looking west, with its gay crowds of pleasure seekers and excursion brakes. Beyond is the town, and to the right we see the too assertive advertisement of the Winter Gardens, from which a view of the same scene from a different aspect is given showing the tram lines and Central Pier.

An extract says: “Back in the distant days of Edward III, that warlike monarch conferred many honours and distinctions upon the valoruous Duke of Lancaster in appreciation of the splendid victories won by the latter on the soil of France, and raised the Duchy of Lancaster into the dignity of a Palatinate - a dignity upheld by succeeding generations of Lancastrians untarnished through the centuries.

“A sturdy race and strong, the lads of Lancashire hold a foremost place in the fields of commerce and sport, and their bright-eyed, boisterous lasses, too, are well in the front ranks of the beauties of England. Skilful in his work and industrious, the Lancastrian earns money easily, and knows how to spend it.

“No time is wasted in factory or workshop, but watch a ‘combine’ of a dozen or more operatives holiday-making at Douglas, Blackpool, or Morecambe, and you will see how vigorously and characteristically the lads and lasses of Lancashire can give themselves up the allurements of pleasure.

“The town which forms the subject of our first illustrations, is situated upon the shores of Morecambe Bay, and a trifle less than five miles from Lancaster.

Heysham, which, with its picturesquely indented shoreline and charming scenery, attracts many visitors. It is a quietly beautiful spot, washed on one side by the lapping waves of Morecambe Bay, and sheltered on the other by high hills.

Heysham, which, with its picturesquely indented shoreline and charming scenery, attracts many visitors. It is a quietly beautiful spot, washed on one side by the lapping waves of Morecambe Bay, and sheltered on the other by high hills.

“Large and flourishing, the growth of Morecambe has kept pace with the demands of its yearly increasing inrush of visitors who hail from all parts of the country, although chiefly from Bradford and other large manufacturing centres in the neighbouring counties.

“The town is well supplied with fine promenades, piers and winter gardens, and is altogether a charming watering place.”