Student killer tells jury: Do I look bothered?

Victim Anuj Bidve
Victim Anuj Bidve
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A KILLER who shot dead an Indian student in a random attack has told a jury: “I love prison. Lock me up for 65 years.”

Kiaran Stapleton, 21, said he had a “fat canteen” in prison and was waiting for a delivery of a new rug and bedding to his cell.

The defendant admits killing Anuj Bidve, 23, in Ordsall, Salford, in the early hours of Boxing Day last year, but denies murder.

He made the comments in his trial at Manchester Crown Court when asked whether he had hoped the psychiatric reports considering the issue of diminished responsibility in his case would be in his favour.

Stapleton replied: “To be honest, I’m not bothered.

“I love prison. I watch Coronation Street. I have got a fat canteen. Lock me up for 65 years.”

Looking to the jury from the witness box, he added: “Does this face look bothered?

“I have even got a new rug and bedding coming for my cell. I’m not bothered.”

Earlier under cross-examination he was twice queried over whether he was mocking the court proceedings.

He told Brian Cummings QC, prosecuting, that he maintained the reason he got a “killer” teardrop tattoo two days after the shooting was because he had killed his goldfish – not an act of bravado in shooting Lancaster University student Mr Bidve.

Stapleton then said: “I don’t wish to discuss that. I might have animal cruelty sending letters to me at HMP Manchester.”

Mr Cummings asked: “Are you being serious or are you making fun of the proceedings?”

“No, no, I’m being serious,” he replied.

The defendant was earlier accused of making fun of the court when answering a question about his stay at the Campanile Hotel in Regent Road – near to the crime scene – the day after the shooting.

The jury has seen CCTV footage of Stapleton looking out of the hotel windows.

Mr Cummings asked him why he was doing so.

Stapleton said: “Seeing if there were nice women walking past ... seeing if there were any nice legs.”

The prosecutor asked: “Is that true or are you having a laugh in this trial?”

“No, that’s true,” Stapleton replied.

Giving evidence, defence psychologist Dr Sanya Krljes said Stapleton had no idea or insight into what had caused him to shoot dead Mr Bidve.

Dr Krljes said: “He said, ‘people think I’m a monster, I was working, a normal boy, had money, I had no drugs in my system. This is why I hope that something is wrong with my brain. I could do it again.’ He felt ‘nothing’ about the shooting.”

When asked of his feelings about the victim, he told her: “I don’t know him. I had no thought of him. Somebody has lost his life.

“I feel nothing, not sad, or bad.”

Stapleton walked up to Mr Bidve and his friends in the street as they walked to the Boxing Day sales and asked the time. He then fired one shot to his victim’s head and ran from the scene.

He admits manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, but denies murder.

The trial continues.