Sailor boy will enjoy life on the ocean wave

Sam Kendall from Morecambe has passed his navy training. Pic: Dave Sherfield.
Sam Kendall from Morecambe has passed his navy training. Pic: Dave Sherfield.
2
Have your say

A former Heysham High School pupil will be sailing the high seas after passing his training in the Royal Navy.

Sam Kendall, 22, from Morecambe, will transfer to HMS Sultan in Hampshire.

There he will learn the skills in marine engineering to keep the ship running smoothly, safely and effectively.

Once fully qualified he will work on everything from the ship’s hull and engines to its electrical, fuel, hydraulic and fire fighting systems.

As the ship will be away from port for weeks at a time, he’ll be trained to make spare parts and other vital components in the ship’s workshops.

Trainee Engineering Technician Sam Kendall arrived at HMS Raleigh, the Royal Navy’s training base in Cornwall, in April.

During a 10-week course he was given a thorough induction into the Royal Navy, learning skills that he will rely upon throughout his time in the Service.

The course culminates with the passing-out-parade attended by families and friends. He said: “I joined the Royal Navy to serve our country, while gaining amazing qualifications and travelling the world.

“Making life-time friends has been one of the highlights of training.

“I also enjoyed the parade training, because being on the parade ground made me proud to be here; and having the opportunity to drive the boats on the river.

“Overall training has been great, very challenging at times, but the good times have certainly out weighed the bad.

“I’ll be leaving Raleigh with a bigger family of friends. I’d like to be selected to fast-track my career and I’d also like HMS Queen Elizabeth to be my first ship.”

The Royal Navy’s Initial Naval Training course is underpinned by nine Core Maritime Skills that are the foundations of naval life and underpin operational effectiveness.

Recruits are taught the basics of Naval discipline and customs.

They learn about navigation and are given the chance to take the helm of their own medium sized inflatable boat during a waterborne orienteering exercise.

Royal Navy personnel can also be called upon to play a vital role in land-based operations, so recruits undergo training in basic combat skills which includes survival in the field.

Fitness is a key component of the training and is delivered using a disciplined method of military fitness which 
focuses on developing co-ordination and individual 
physical strength and endurance.