If we could Turn Back Time

The Meadows family leave their "working class" house which Phil describes as "like a cave with a door".
The Meadows family leave their "working class" house which Phil describes as "like a cave with a door".

A SMALL section of street in the West End of Morecambe has entered a time warp.

Children dressed in period Edwardian clothes play happily in the street. A vintage “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” car is parked by the kerb. And a row of four three-storey terraced houses have been sandblasted, refurnished and restored to become authentic homes of the early 1900s.

For six weeks, Albert Road has become the set of Turn Back Time, the TV show where families experience living in the past.

Researchers scoured the country to find the ideal location for the second series of the hit BBC1 programme. They chose Morecambe.

Now, part of the West End street has been sealed off whilst cameras follow modern people struggling to cope with different periods of 20th Century history.

The cast are not actors, they are real families, who have taken on the roles of their ancestors to discover how life was at different ends of the social spectrum, starting with the early 1900s.

The Meadows family are pretending to be working class. In real life, Phil and Suzie (both 50), and their teenage daughters Saskia and Genevieve run a polo school in posh Berkshire.

The Goldings from Chester – customer service consultant Ian and his accountant wife Naomi (both 39), and their three young children Ciara, Caitie and Jack – are “middle class”.

See The Visitor (27-03-12) for full story.