Campus in the city column: poetry is new trend

Campus in the City visitor Amelie trying out erasure poetry with Cumbrian poet Polly Atkin.
Campus in the City visitor Amelie trying out erasure poetry with Cumbrian poet Polly Atkin.

We took a trip to Cumbria without leaving the shop on Saturday for our ‘Mapping the Lakes’ event, writes co-manager Lindsey King.

We had a fantastic day taking a look at the things that make the Lakes such a popular place to live and visit, and that make it the basis of so much research that takes place on campus.

We were joined by the Wordsworth Trust which helped us build a flock of ‘rocking’ Herdwick sheep and explored the rich literary heritage of the area with Cumbrian poet Polly Atkin. Polly taught us a writing technique called ‘erasure poetry,’ in which words are picked from a pre-printed page (we used photocopies from Wordsworth’s work) and the rest is coloured in; making a poem and a picture at the same time.

We will be continuing the theme of journeys with our Active and Healthy Communities event today (Thursday), as we take a trip around our mini street and look at the health choices we make.

And we will be travelling back in time on Saturday (May 14) as we take a look at life in Lancaster in 1916.

A team from the Lancaster University History Department, Lancaster Civic Society and the King’s Own Royal Regiment Museum will be armed with scanners and recording equipment to collect as many family stories and artefacts as possible, in order to try to understand the ways that World War One affected local people.

We will also try out a brilliant new app which takes users on an interactive journey around World War One sites in the city. The first walk with the app will take place on Saturday and will be led by Peter Donnelly from the King’s Own Royal Regiment Museum. It will set off at 11am from our shop in St Nics. There’s no need to book – just turn up!

Visitors will have a chance to meet a World War One soldier from 2pm and take part in a host of other activities.