Balloons released in memory of ‘little fighter’ Charlie

Balloons being released at the memorial service for Charlie Younger.
Balloons being released at the memorial service for Charlie Younger.
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Family and friends released balloons at a special memorial service held to remember the life of a little boy who passed away a year ago.

Seven-year-old Charlie Younger died in hospital in Sheffield on July 19 2016, surrounded by his mum Karen, dad Gary and older brother Aiden.

Charlie Younger, pictured in 2013.

Charlie Younger, pictured in 2013.

Severely disabled Charlie required 24-hour care after suffering severe brain damage due to complications during his birth.

He had complex needs including lung disease, cerebral palsy, scoliosis and epilepsy, and had to be fed through a tube in his stomach and use an oxygen tank during the night.

His family planned the special memorial service a year on from his death, which was held at Scotforth Cemetery, where Charlie is buried.

Friends and family gathered to remember Charlie and have messages read out.

Balloons being released at the memorial service for Charlie Younger.

Balloons being released at the memorial service for Charlie Younger.

At the end of the service they then released balloons in Charlie’s memory.

Charlie’s mum Karen said: “I want Charlie to be remembered as he was a beautiful special child.

“The condition he was born in should have never happened and because of that his life was very short, but he loved life and was a little fighter.”

As a tot Charlie’s family, who live in Chequers Avenue, Lancaster, were told he would have a short life expectancy, but he defied specialists to remain out of hospital for much of his life.

Charlie Younger, pictured in June 2016.

Charlie Younger, pictured in June 2016.

However, Charlie was taken ill out of the blue and suffered a heart attack which caused his organs to fail.

He was taken to the Royal Lancaster Infirmary and later transferred to a children’s hospital in Sheffield where he passed away.

“He was always a fighter but obviously this time he just couldn’t fight it,” Karen said at the time. “He had been through the mill in his short life but the last three years he had been much better.

“Charlie was an amazing little boy. He lived a good life and we fought very hard to give him that.

“Even with his complex needs he was a very happy child, and was very much loved by his mummy and daddy, grandparents and big brother Aiden.”