All quiet on resort front on VE Day

Crowds gather for communal singing the day after VE Day in Dalton Square, Lancaster. This picture was loaned by Mrs M. Tennant of Lancaster who worked in the Guardian office from 1944-48. The photo was taken by Guardian photographer Harry Hodgson.

Crowds gather for communal singing the day after VE Day in Dalton Square, Lancaster. This picture was loaned by Mrs M. Tennant of Lancaster who worked in the Guardian office from 1944-48. The photo was taken by Guardian photographer Harry Hodgson.

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Millions of people remembered the day the guns fell silent in Europe, 70 years on.

Friday, May 8 was the 70th anniversary of VE Day when people took to the streets in joy to celebrate the end of the Second World War.

But in Morecambe, the date passed quietly with no official event of commemoration.

Mick Dennison, president of the Morecambe branch of the Royal British Legion, said: “It was a shame.

“But I don’t think there was any push in our small town to get things done. We haven’t got a Territorial Army centre in Morecambe.

“My auntie said to me that on VE Day itself in 1945, there was nothing other than great rejoicing in the streets. There were no parades organised.

“The big national day of commemoration was in London on Saturday and anybody else who put anything on in other cities and towns, then fair play.

“The election didn’t help in a town like Morecambe because all the (council) officials were working for three days.

“Some people did their own thing and would have gone to the war memorial. We as the British Legion didn’t do anything official in Morecambe, we do Anzac Day, Armed Forces Day and Remembrance Day. Nobody approached us and asked ‘what can we do’. We can’t lead the way all the time.”

Union flags flew from Morecambe and Lancaster town halls on the day and the Lancaster branch of the Royal British Legion held a ceremony in the memorial gardens at Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Castle also marked the anniversary.

A specially commissioned v-shaped beacon was placed on the rooftop of the John of Gaunt Gate and fired as part of a nationwide chain of 139 beacons up and down the country at 21.32 precisely.

Staff and guests at the Bull Hotel pub in Morecambe marked the date by singing war songs and holding a two minutes silence.

The Second World War lasted six years and one day in total, from September 1 1939 – September 2 1945.