Aids babies receive warm gifts

Organiser Wendy Lyth (second right) with some of the ladies from the Rainbow Centre who have knitted hundreds of jumpers for newborn babies in Africa who are normally wrapped in newspaper when they are born, and called 'fish and chip' babies.
Organiser Wendy Lyth (second right) with some of the ladies from the Rainbow Centre who have knitted hundreds of jumpers for newborn babies in Africa who are normally wrapped in newspaper when they are born, and called 'fish and chip' babies.

BABIES in Africa born with Aids who leave hospital wrapped in newspaper will soon be wearing jumpers knitted by members of the Rainbow Centre in Morecambe.

The newborn babies who are born with the killer disease are known as the “fish and chip babies” but with the help of kind ladies from Morecambe and across the country, they can at least be kept warm.

Manager of the Rainbow Centre on Clarence Street, Susan Wilson, said: “A member was talking about knitting the jumpers and we thought “what a good idea” so we put the knitting pattern in the newsletter.

“It just grew from there. The babies are born with Aids and don’t have much chance of survival but these little jumpers are given to the hospital for the babies.”

Centre user Wendy Lyth said: “I came to the Rainbow Centre for a French class and I was sitting at a table talking about the knitting pattern.

“It just means doing a bit of knitting and we can send these out to the kids.

“Everyone has been so kind and its been received so well and has grown so much.

“We have knitted nearly 300 jumpers which will go to Uganda and South Africa.”

Susan said: “We’ve been surprised at the response. Every day someone has brought a jumper in.

“It’s just mushroomed. I never imagined it would be like this, it is just amazing.”

The Rainbow Centre members will carry on knitting the tiny jumpers until Christmas.

A 500g ball of wool costs just £1.

If you can help by donating double knit wool, in bright colours, contact the Rainbow Centre on 01524 415502 or pop into the centre on Clarence Street in Morecambe.