Exhibition goes behind scenes of Lancaster factory

Textile artist Michael Brennand-Wood with his work which appears at the exhibition. Picture by Darren Andrews.
Textile artist Michael Brennand-Wood with his work which appears at the exhibition. Picture by Darren Andrews.

An exhibition revealing the hidden history of an award-winning Lancaster fabric printing factory opens in the city this March.

Behind The Wall, which runs at Lancaster City Museum from March 4-May 1, explores and reveals the heritage and everyday world of Standfast & Barracks.

Adam Clarke with some of his Minecraft work devised for the Behind The Wall Exhibition. Youngsters will be pleased Minecraft is also part of the exhibition. Picture by Darren Andrews.

Adam Clarke with some of his Minecraft work devised for the Behind The Wall Exhibition. Youngsters will be pleased Minecraft is also part of the exhibition. Picture by Darren Andrews.

Mirador, a new Lancaster-based arts and heritage company, has attracted some of the country’s most creative minds to bring the Caton Road site’s story to life – from its birth as a carriage and wagon works and its role as an internment camp in World War One to its nine decades as an international fabric printing company.

“Thousands of people pass this site on a main thoroughfare into the city every day yet few know anything about its past,” said George Harris, one of Mirador’s creative producers.

The artwork includes Ghosts in the Machine, a textile exhibit by Michael Brennand-Wood, and crafted panels exploring time, structure and history created by artist Caroline Bartlett.

There’ll also be a family friendly ‘time machine’ inspired by the Standfast & Barracks clock tower, representing stories in miniature produced by Lancashire-based Bonker*s & Clutterbucks.

Inside the model of the Standfast & Barracks clock tower, part of a display created by Bonkers & Clutterbucks. Picture by Darren Andrews.

Inside the model of the Standfast & Barracks clock tower, part of a display created by Bonkers & Clutterbucks. Picture by Darren Andrews.

Lancaster photographer, Darren Andrews, has produced ‘camera-less’ photogram images printed onto fabrics of objects discovered around Standfast and Katie Duxbury has created a crinoline reflecting its history. Young people can also use Minecraft in the exhibition.

Actress Christine Bissell in the Standfast & Barracks factory modelling the crinoline created by Katie Duxbury for the exhibition.

Actress Christine Bissell in the Standfast & Barracks factory modelling the crinoline created by Katie Duxbury for the exhibition.

One of Darren Andrews' photograms which will be on display.

One of Darren Andrews' photograms which will be on display.